Neuroscience and Belief

Despite all the effort made by parents and teachers, the C student has always ended up with average grades. Its unfortunate that some of these students have spent their teen years being labelled as slow learners, indecisive and not intelligent.
But is this really true?

Being a C student myself I couldnt help but wonder, why I was not as intelligent as the rest. What was the difference between the student that scored an A and the student that scored a C on the exam. These questions are what led me on a quest for knowledge.

Well, the first thing I had to do was look up the meaning of intelligence.

Intelligence is often defined as our intellectual potential, something we are born with; something that can be measured and a capacity that is difficult to change. In recent years however, other views of intelligence have emerged. One is the theory of multiple intelligences proposed by Harvard psychologist Howard Gardner.

Howard Gardners theory suggests that traditional psychometric views of intelligences are limited to one scope. Howard has done a great job of identifying different kinds of intelligences some of which are not recognized by our education system. For example some people poses intrapersonal, interpersonal, kinaesthetic, visual and linguistic intelligences. Learning more about multiple intelligences can help one understand their own strengths. Howards book is a great book, one I highly recomend. A very relevant book for parents raising children. These intelligences can be nurtured separately. It prevents students from being labelled because he or she may not be good at linear logic chains.

Neuroscience has had a positive impact on this subject to.
We used to think that the brain stopped developing in adolesence. But after extensive research we now know that the brain is a highly active and malleable learning machine. This means we can influence our brain development in many ways. All we have to do is challenge the brain.

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